Canning Lake Property Owners Association Inc.

  • HISTORY OF ROAD NAMES


  • Alton Road
  • Alton Road was named after my Great Uncle, Alton Hughes. My grandfather, Charlie Shaw, owned much of the land on the south shore of Canning Lake from June Anderson’s to Ralph and Nan Dell’s as well as the land on both sides of the Drag River from Gelert Road 1 to the end of Alton Road and Dragonfly Lane. Much of this land was sold off or gifted to individuals from 1952 to 1980. My grandfather’s sister, Shirley, and her husband, Alton Hughes wished to build a cottage on the east side of Drag River so a part was passed on to them. They subsequently built their cottage and enjoyed the area with many of their friends and family until Alton passed away. Alton and Shirley’s son, Jim, still maintains a cottage on the opposite side of the river overlooking his parents’ original site. When 911 was introduced, it was their son who put forth the name to ensure his family’s legacy would continue. (submitted by Doug Shaw)

  • Alvic Lane
  • Fondly named after Alice and Victor Könni who, after they sold Sunny Rock Lodge in the early 1950’s, built a cottage on what is now known as Alvic Lane. (submitted by their grandson, Bryan Winterflood)

  • Bat Lake Road
  • This Township road name existed prior to the 911 Road Naming Project. The assumption can be made that as this road provides access to Bat Lake that it is named after Bat Lake.

  • Beaverdam Trail
  • Named for a large beaver pond and dam near the road, once washed out by the dam breaking during a wet spring. (Submitted by Roger Saarimaki)

  • Canfield Lane
  • No one seems to know the story although one cottager thought “Can” was for Canning Lake and “field” was for a nearby field. Perhaps this is the story or perhaps this name was assigned by the 911 Road Naming Project.*

  • Canning Heights Road
  • “I was at the meeting where we discussed the name switch from Sandy Beach Road to an alternative. As “Dugan Road” had been earlier decided upon by the people on the northern branch of the road, at our meeting, everyone liked Canning Heights. (Sandy Beach had already been taken by people outside our area.) When you drive along our road, you see the lake from above the water. (submitted by John Collins)

  • Carefree Drive
  • A property owner believes the story was submitted by another property owner on the road but they do not know whom, nor the story behind the name.

  • Cassia Lane
  • Cassia Lane was a spur on Beaverdam Trail that required a name during the 911 Road Naming Project. Cassia Lane was named after the constellation “Cassiopeia” located in the northern sky and named after the vain queen Cassiopeia in Greek mythology who boasted about her unrivalled beauty. (submitted by Brad Cundiff)

  • Cleo Lane
  • Named after the famed jazz singer, Cleo Laine. (Also, reference can be made to a fondly remembered dog called Cleo, short for Cleopatra!) (submitted anonymously)

  • Communication Lane
  • It is unknown how this road name came to be.

  • Cooks Lane
  • Named after Cook’s Farm, purchased by Nancy and Robert Cook in 1962. The original farm was purchased in 1868, under patent and registered with the Crown Land Registry in Peterborough, by Francis Wilson. (submitted by Nancy Cook)

  • Dragonfly Lane
  • “I was the person on Dragonfly Lane who came up with the name which was quickly agreed to by everyone on our Lane. The reason for the name is simple. We wanted the word “Drag” in there and it is hard to be a pleasing use of the word and Dragonfly was the simple and obvious choice!”

  • Dugan Road
  • “Our cottage road, formerly named Sandy Beach Road and now named Dugan Road was named after Carl Dugan once owner of the “Dugan Farm” in the 1960’s located on Country Road 17 (Ingoldsby Road) at the large bend in the road opposite Marathon Drive and Canning Heights Road.” “Last summer, an old guy came cantering down our driveway. He extended a hand and a loud “Hi there. I’m Carl Dugan!” I told him I preferred the sound of Sandy Beach Road to Dugan Road. He explained that his Grandfather operated the farm on Ingoldsby Road back in the 1860’s. It’s now known as the Schilling Farm, I believe. Maybe someday they’ll change the name again...this time to Schilling Road (I still prefer Sandy Beach Road.)”
  • Ernie's Trail
  • The road is named after Rollie's dad, Ernie Wagg. Ernie was born and raised on the Manitoulin and came to Haliburton with his brother in the 1920's looking for work. He worked in the Ingoldsby store for some time and boarded and worked for Vinton Loucks at the Loucks farm as well. The farm is the one at the very end of Bat Lake Road, but the road did not extend that far at the time. The access to the farm was from Hwy 121. There was a foot trail from the farm to the lake used for swimming, fishing, etc. at that time. Ernie expanded the trail using hand tools only (saw, scythe, etc.) to create what we refer to as the “Tunnel Road” - the private road that heads toward the lake from the official end of Bat Lake Road through the tunnel of trees. As cottages were built down this road over time, the road was extended. Ernie married the young school teacher Madeleine Loucks, Vinton's younger sister, and took her away to Toronto, and eventually to Sudbury, to make his fortune. their first child, Rollie, was born in Gramma Loucks' farmhouse in 1938. The family visited the farm for vacation time every year until Ernie built his cottage by the lake in the early 1950's and extended the roas to that point, this time with some help from farm equipment. He then helped Rollie build his cottage right next door in 1963. Rollie was an active director of the CLPOA for many years until his untimely death in 2010. Further extensionsto the road were made in the 1980's as other lots were severed and cottages built. with the 911 project, the tunnel road was deemed an extension of Bat lake Road and so named, although it remains a private road for maintenance purposes. That means that cottagers on that part of the road remain responsible for the upkeep of the road, not the township. The small offshoot of the tunnel road that leads to Ernie'e and Rollie's cottages was named Ernie's Trail in honour of the man who cut the road so many long years ago. (submitted by Kathie Wagg)
  • Feldspar Lane
  • This name was assigned by the 911 Road Naming Project.*
  • The submission of “Will’s Lane” was made by the late Bob Campbell to honour the Will Family who were one of the first Canning Lake cottagers. They bought their property from the Loucks Family in 1932. The road naming process was unclear and although a few options/variations were submitted, everyone believed the road would be named Will’s Lane. Imagine everyone’s surprise to see a name that had never been chosen – Feldspar Lane. If only one of us had been contacted to figure out which name would have worked. We would most certainly have found a more relevant name. All of us on this road are either descendants of the Will Family or the Campbell Family and are lifelong friends. Our cottage history is very important to us. (submitted by the residents of Feldspar Lane)

  • Fieldings Crescent
  • The original owners of the property that ran from where the Kash Landing Café is, all the way to the channel (encompassing the properties on Fieldings Crescent and Canfield Lane) was owned by the Fielding Family who were among the first settlers in the area. (submitted by Steve Manol)

  • Gelert Road
  • Named for the hamlet of Gelert on this road nearly half way from Kinmount to Haliburton. Gelert was once a train stop from 1878 to the late 1960’s and major center for goods distribution with two stores, two churches, and a school. During the second World War, many people used the train to Gelert to get to the three lodges on Canning Lake for vacations. (Submitted by Roger Saarimaki)

  • Gravel Pit Road
  • In 1968, there was a gravel pit in the area and the roads were called Gravel Pit Road Left and Gravel Pit Road Right. For the 911 Road Naming Project, Gravel Pit Road Left became Gravel Pit Road. Gravel Pit Road Right became Masters Lane (see explanation under Masters Lane). (submitted by Bert Trollope)

  • Hamlin Lane
  • Hamlin Lane is named after the Hamlin family who owned the tract of land extending down what was formerly Silverwood Road Right. They owned a cottage on the property that is now 1051 Silverwood Road.

  • Hawkins Trail
  • Named after Murray Hawkins, the original owner of the properties on this road beginning at the first waterfront property on the road and most of the island. I bought my property from Murray Hawkins in 1958. (submitted by Bruce Farmer)

  • Hosta Lane
  • Named after the Hosta plant that grows along the side of the lane. (from Mary McCrae)

  • Ingoldsby Road
  • This Township road name existed prior to the 911 Road Naming Project.

  • Kashagawigamog Lake Road
  • This Township road name existed prior to the 911 Road Naming Project.
  • “Kashagawigamog” is an Ojibwe word that is roughly translated as “lake of shining waters” or “lake of long and winding waters”. (received from the Lake Kashagawigamog Organization)
    Ketola Lane
  • Named for Arne Ketola and his family, one of the original Finnish Village members who first bought property on Canning Lake back in the 1930’s. (Submitted by Roger Saarimaki)

  • Kitty Kat Lane
  • As the deadline for submissions approached, several of us met and brainstormed to come up with a suitable name for our lane. The first name choices were traditional and serious -- Echo Point Lane because the property at the end of the lane was always known as echo point, and Highland Lane to reflect the Haliburton Highlands and the fact that two families were of Scottish heritage. We were hoping that one of those would be chosen. Our final choice was a fun name based on the fact that several of the residents had felines as pets. Clearly, the selection committee went with the fun factor. (submitted by Diane Forbes)
    Loucks Lane
  • Named for the Loucks clan whose ancestors, in the 1800’s, cleared and ran a farm that included a large portion of lake frontage on the north side of Canning Lake at the end of Bat Lake Road. (Submitted by Roger Saarimaki)

  • Macklin Trail
  • “Macklin Trail was named after the Macklin family, John and Alli and their 2 children Alan and Anita. I’m not sure when or who decided on this name. We went home at the end of one summer and came back the next and there was the road sign! I don’t know exactly when the Macklin family purchased their cottage property, but my guess would be late 1930’s to early 1940’s. They were one of the first Finnish families on our road.”

  • Marathon Drive
  • For the naming process, all six families got together with three proposed names each. We voted on a name and submitted it. When I went to the county office to check on something else, I discovered our submission had been changed to “Chimney Sweep Lane” and was told that the name we’d picked was like another name so ours had to be changed and they’d just given us a new name. After complaining that we’d followed the process and should be given time to make another choice, they gave me a list of names to choose from. The cottagers met again and voted on Marathon Drive as one cottager used to run marathons and continues to run at the cottage. I took the name to the county office and was told that they already had a Marathon Drive sign that was not going to be used as the road was really part of another road so “fine, done”. Shortly thereafter, the sign was put up. (submitted by Diane
  • Gandy)

  • Masters Lane
  • With a gravel pit in the area, the original two roads were called Gravel Pit Road Left and Gravel Pit Road Right. For the 911 Road Naming Project, Gravel Pit Road Left became Gravel Pit Road. Unfortunately for Gravel Pit Road Right, after suggesting several names to the 911 Road Naming Project, one name being “Right Road” to retain the history of the original road name, the cottagers were so discouraged they said “ok, you pick one” and the road name became Masters Lane. (submitted by Harry Gerber)
  • Norandy Lane
  • Affectionately named after Nora and Andy Wilson who built their cottage in 1954.

  • Porky’s Road
  • Named for Francis Walker (Porky) who did much trucking and construction in the area from the 1960’s onward. His house was on the curve between Scotts Dam Road and South Lake Road. (Submitted by Roger Saarimaki)

  • Pyramid Drive
  • “In trying to keep a Finnish tradition on road names, we were foiled numerous times. Our names were rejected. Pyramid was pulled out of a hat by someone!”
    Ranta Trail
  • “When asked to come up with some suggestions for road names when 911 was introduced, our family name was the oldest Finnish family name left on our road for one of the branches being renamed. Frank and Eleanor Ranta purchased their cottage lot in 1946. At the time there was no road on our side of the lake and cottage lumber was brought from Bat Lake Road, across the lake by row boats. The literal translation for “ranta” from Finnish to English means shore, shoreline, waterfront, hence, appropriate cottage name both for road and cottage!”
  • Rest Lane
  • Named for Rest Point Lodge that existed on Canning Lake from 1930 to 1955. (Submitted by Roger Saarimaki)
    Saltmarsh Lane
  • This name was assigned by the 911 Road Naming Project.*

  • Scotts Dam Road
  • This Township road name existed prior to the 911 Road Naming Project.

  • Shaws Lane
  • Named for the Shaw family that owned the house at the corner of Shaws Lane and South Lake Road. (Submitted by Roger Saarimaki)

  • Silverwood Road
  • Silverwood Road was named for Silverwood Lodge which was built in the early 1940’s I think. The lodge was named for the profusion of white/silver birch trees that, at one time, were the dominant tree on the original Silverwood Lodge property. Unfortunately, many of them have died in the last 30 years and they don’t seem to be regenerating all that well.” Silverwood Lodge is located at 1218 Silverwood Road, now a private cottage.

  • Sisters Lane
  • Named for the two Lang sisters, Christine and Thelma, who also cottaged on the river property their parents first bought and built on. (Submitted by Roger Saarimaki)

  • Sterling Lane
  • So named because when Marg and Casey Sterling bought their property in the 1950’s, they got a highway sign that said “Marg and Casey Sterling”. Because there was a cost to putting up a sign, the rest of the people on that road just told their visitors to look for the Sterling’s sign when giving people directions to their cottages. As a result, it is now Sterling Lane. (Submitted by Robert Taylor)

  • Totem Trail
  • This name was assigned by the 911 Road Naming Project.*

  • Tranquility Trail
  • Selected from a list of possibilities by Roger Mole, and Betty and Murray Brown. (submitted by The Taylor’s)

  • Viking Lane
  • Everyone on Viking Lane has a Finnish or Nordic background; therefore, it was easy to agree on, and submit the name. (submitted by Bill Sutherland)
    Vinton Lane
  • Vinton Lane, off the Bat Lake Road, is named to remember my father, A. Vinton Loucks. He owned the 500-acre farm that once included a mile and a half of frontage on the north side of Canning Lake. The back land of the farm went all the way out to Highway 121. Vinton was the grandson (and grand-nephew) of pioneers, three brothers and a sister, who each took out patents for land grants from the Ontario government in 1868. Much of that land eventually came to Vinton. The Bat Lake Road was extended only in 1977 to serve most of the north-side cottages built on the land he sold to summer residents while he and his family continued to farm. Vinton Lane, as a service road with three cottages (mine, Hawkins, and Hymus) is on land that is still in the family after these 144 years. Hopefully, at least the road name will last as long again. (submitted by Orie Loucks)

  • Warburton Lane
  • The original name submitted was “Ross Lane” in recognition of a family on the road. Unfortunately this name was not accepted and Warburton Lane was assigned by the 911 Road Naming Project.* (submitted by Theresia Buchnea)


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